Friday, March 11, 2005


A Very Good Thing Indeed

Victor Davis Hanson in "A Look Back," in the current National Review Online, concisely summarizes the foreign policy accomplishments since 9/11/01 in stunning contrast to the expectations of the naysayers and detractors of the Administration's responses to 9/11.

At every turn, the President and his national security team rejected calls to inaction, warnings of dire consequences, entreaties to compromise, appease, or otherwise engage diplomatically. And in rejecting each call for inaction or to sustain the status quo, America and her allies forged the basis for beyond-hoped-for success.

Hanson concludes:
Every time the United States the last quarter century had acted boldly — its removal of Noriega and aid for the Contras, instantaneous support for a reunified Germany, extension of NATO, preference for Yeltsin instead of Gorbachev, Gulf War I, bombing of Milosevic, support for Sharon's fence, withdrawal from Gaza and decapitation of the Hamas killer elite, taking out the Taliban and Saddam-good things have ensued. In contrast, on every occasion that we have temporized — abject withdrawal from Lebanon, appeasement of Arafat at Oslo, a decade of inaction in the Balkans, paralysis in Rwanda, sloth in the face of terrorist attacks, not going to Baghdad in 1991 — corpses pile up and the United States became either less secure or less respected or both.

So it is also in this present war, in which our unheralded successes far outweigh our notorious mistakes. A number of books right now in galleys are going to look very, very silly, as they forecast American defeat, a failed Middle East, and the wages of not listening to their far smarter recommendations of using the U.N. more, listening to Europe, or bringing back the Clinton A-Team.

America's daring, not its support for the familiar — but ultimately unstable and corrupt — status quo, explains why less than three years after September 11, the Middle East is a world away from where it was on the first day of the war. And that is a very good thing indeed.

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